The Lenovo Saga – Part 3 – The End?

After the last blog post, we received a call from John Lewis saying that Lenovo had contact them, and was shipping it BACK. This was on the last day before we could get a refund, meaning I had to wait 5 days extra! But we did the hour drive to our nearest John Lewis, and Success! It works, even though it went to Germany according to the Employee. Oh well, at least I got it back.

Oh wait, I forgot i’m me.

Today, during my journey back from college, my Lenovo Yoga 710 cracked at the corner of the glass screen. This screen is not common like cheaper and legendary (ie. Macbook Pro). The screen costs £200 if you can find it in stock, which is just under a third of what I paid for it. I am student, so money is a once a year kinda thing. Even if we buy the the screen, installing it will be a nightmare. I’m so flipping sick of this! I know its my fault, but still its a extra stress with I thought iI removed, but it has to come back at GCSEs time as well! I don’t know how we will solve this, I don’t want a £650 paperweight.

The Lenovo Saga – Part 2- The Wait of 28 Working Days

This continues from Part 1 – The ‘Great’ Wall of Lenovo

After sending my Lenovo Yoga 710 Laptop to John Lewis, we were told it normally takes about 14 days to complete a repair, and they had up to 28 days to repair. Fine, we said. There is no tracking available on John Lewis’ website, so 14 days later we called them up to check the progress of it. After a bit of fumbling around on their side we found out that laptop hadn’t left the store we sent it into yet because Lenovo’s Magic Van hasn’t arrived. A week later, we called again, asking for the progress. It had now left the store, but Lenovo was closed, so they couldn’t ask them on the progress. Plus, in the conversation, we found out is not just 28 days, but 28 working days! Bringing the Laptop Refund date 3rd April 2017 and almost two months since the laptop broke. I am so tired and stressed out after the deadline keeps getting pushed back. I brought this laptop for education and it has taught me something, not to buy Lenovo products ever again! John Lewis keeps saying ‘We will contact Lenovo for Progress” yet we hear nothing back.

*sigh*

The Death of The Potato Game (aka why you should backup)

Welp, this is annoying. This Potato Quality Picture is of my Lenovo Yoga 710 that I brought myself (with the help from family members) for Christmas. I’ve had it about 2 months, and it’s dead. During my use today it Blue Screen’d, which is mildly annoying, but I suspected windows just being windows. Nope, the 256GB SSD inside is no longer detected the BIOS, Windows Installer says their is a 0MB Drive, and Ubuntu finds nothing. The issue is, this laptop contained the only copy of the game I was working on for a Level 2 Game Development Course, and various other projects for my education. I had just setup a Backup system for my desktop a couple of weeks ago, and was going to get it working for the laptop this weekend. Even so, it’s an SSD, so it wont fail within 2 months of buying it? *sigh* Karma hit me hard,  I said to another individual telling me about the lost data they had I responded “You should do backups”. I have contacted Lenovo to repair it, under warranty  and I have to hope is just a loose connection and nothing has happened to said data.

Happy Valentines Day! The Day of Loosing data to Cupid.

Why won’t VGA die?

Video Graphics Array (or VGA) is obsolete, outdated and inferior to better standards. Why is still in use? In the UK its seems that every monitor (except from those new frangled 4K or ultrawide) supports it, and every other laptop that can fit it has one. The biggest issue about this standard for projectors that schools got 10 years ago and being the ONLY way of input to the monitor i’m typing on right now is that it’s ANALOGUE. This first means to signal quality decreases over distance. I’ve seen it where schools have the projector 20 metres away from the source, and then the picture looks complete arse.

The most annoying thing is getting converters for it. If you have a DVI Connector on your Laptop, your lying or talking about your Windows 98 machine with a serial port! HDMI to DVI then VGA wont work as HDMI is digital, DVI is both digital and analogue and VGA is only analogue, it just never works. HDMI to VGA adapters do exists, but the ones I’ve tried failed to display at the correction resolution or fail really quickly. Getting my new Yoga 710 laptop to connect to any projector (which happens a lot mind you) is a total nightmare!

*sigh* Americas and Europe seemed to move away from this standard faster, although DVI isn’t much better, at least it still is compatible with HDMI directly. Just needed to get this off my chest because I have been having so many issues with VGA cables it’s driving me crazy.

ALSO, Never, Never, Never screw in the little devils at the side, trying to take them out in a cramped desk area is the bloody worst!

As requested by Rico – A Description of TF2

He said my description of TF2 on my coursework is too short.  I said I would post it on here. I thought it would be a little bit longer. Boy I was wrong. Copied in full, no spell/grammar checks.

Team Fortress 2 (known as TF2) is a class based first person shooter. You choose from 9 different and unique classes with their own play styles and weapons. These classes are: The Scout, The Soldier, The Pyro, The Demoman, The Heavy, The Engineer, The Medic, The Sniper and Gabe Newells favourate class, The Spy. The Scout’s role is to flank, armed with a scattergun, a pistol and a bat, the scout can do high amounts of damage while taking minimal amount of damage by utalising his double jump feature, allowing him to doge splash damage from explosives. The soldiers role is to do large amounts of damage with his rocket launcher, shotgun and shovel. The demoman can use his secondary weapon to create traps that he can detonate at any time or he can use his primary weapon, the grenade launcher to do 100 damage if it hits the target directly. The pyro is another flanking class armed with a flamethrow, a shotgun and a fire axe. With his flame thrower you can press Mouse2 to use his “compression blast” to blast enemies and incomming projectiles away. The heavy is a tanking class, designed to do large amounts of damage with his minigun, shotgun and his own two fists. the engineer is a defensive class that can build sentires with his wrench. He can also build dispencers to give health and ammo to team mates and teleporters to get people from capture point A to capture pont B quickly. The medic is a healer class with his medigun, syringe gun and bone saw. the sniper is designed to be in the background, picking off targets with his sniper rifle that does 150 damage with a quickscope headshot, or 450 damage if you stay scoped in long enough. The spy is a stealth class that can go invisible and disguise as enemy gamers. He can also use his Electro Sapper to sap engineer buildings.

There are many gamemodes in TF2 ranging from payload, where the BLU team pushes a bomb into the RED teams base. King of The Hill (KOTH) Where BLU and RED fight over a single control point they have to control for a total of 3 minutes before they win the round and even a co-op game mode called “Mann VS Machine” where a team of 6 players on the RED team fight against waves of robots collecting their money and buying upgrades

TF2 isn’t just about using the same class with the same weapons. There are many weapon and cosmetic unlocks for each class that change the way the class is played. There is a weapon called “The Rocket Jumper” that does no damage at all to you or enemies and is commonly used with “The Market Gardener” a melee for the soldier that, when he is in the air from blast jumping, allows him to deal a critical hit to his enemies